Supposed Enlightenment

enlightening

Friends, I hope you’ll enjoy this cartoon as much as I did.

Disclosure: If you end up going to the cartoonist’s blog, know that there’s a fair amount of cursing in many of the cartoons, so if that’s not for you, I’d forgo it.

Candorville always has something funny and poignant to say. Visit that website without fear:

2009-09-13-some2

Erin McKean redefines the Dictionary – From TED.com

An excellent lecture on lexicography by Erin McKean, emailed to me by my friend Lauren, who is jealous of Ms McKean’s occupation and fashion sense.

Story: This past Christmas, I asked my parents for something special: an electronic dictionary. For some reason or another, I’ve been loving looking up words I don’t understand. As I read my texts last Fall, I began to go to my computer’s dictionary often, out of curiosity. ‘What EXACTLY does this word mean?’ Or if I was writing, I’d often wonder the same question, along with doubting my spelling skills more often.

Thoughts: I love McKean’s idea of the next phase of “the dictionary”. Instead of being a symbol of the English language, like the US flag is a symbol of the country, the next way of doing the dictionary would make the paper dictionaries nearly obsolete! We would find almost EVERY word used in this new dictionary, with context and numerous definitions. An electronic dictionary isn’t much more helpful than a paper one. An expanded, hyper-linked, contextualized dictionary would be so much more awesome. Like McKean, I find words all the time that aren’t in the New Oxford American Dictionary on my Mac or in the Merriam-Webster on my Franklin electronic dictionary or on the Dictionary.com application on my phone. Lexicographers must begin collecting these words, and not just Wikipedia.

I wish I listened to TED lectures more often…

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more about “Erin McKean redefines the Dictionary …“, posted with vodpod

Some cool quotations that rock my socks/mind

Here are cool quotes that are awesomely intense. I love to be challenged by ancient wisdom and prophetic voices.

“Come now, you rich people, weep and wail for the miseries that are coming to you. Your riches have rotted, and your clothes are moth-eaten. Your gold and silver have rusted, and their rust will be evidence against you, and it will eat your flesh like fire. You have laid up treasure for the last days. Listen! The wages of the laborers who mowed your fields, which you kept back by fraud, cry out, and the cries of the harvesters have reached the ears of the Lord of hosts. You have lived on the earth in luxury and in pleasure; you have fattened your hearts on a day of slaughter. You have condemned and murdered the righteous one, who does not resist you”  – James 5:1-6

“I do nothing but go about persuading you all, old and young alike, not to take thought for your persons or your properties, but and chiefly to care about the greatest improvement of the soul. I tell you that virtue is not given by money, but that from virtue comes money and every other good of man, public as well as private. This is my teaching, and if this is the doctrine which corrupts the youth, I am a mischievous person.” – Socrates, Apology

“Fill your bowl to the brim
and it will spill.
Keep sharpening your knife
and it will blunt.
Chase after money and security
and your heart will never unclench.
Care about people’s approval
and you will be their prisoner.

Do your work, then step back.
The only path to serenity.”

– Tao Te Ching, 9